Sudan is currently in the midst of a violent power struggle, as two factions battle for control of the country. The conflict is between General Abdel-Fattah Burhan, commander of the armed forces, and General Mohammed Hamdan Dagalo, head of the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces (RSF), who orchestrated a military coup in October 2021.

Over the weekend, violence erupted, resulting in at least 185 deaths and over 1,800 wounded, with fears that the actual number of casualties may be much higher. The two sides are heavily armed, with tanks, artillery, and other heavy weapons being used in densely populated areas. Fighter jets have also been seen overhead, while anti-aircraft fire has lit up the skies. These scenes of fighting in the capital, Khartoum, and the adjoining city, Omdurman, are unprecedented.

Millions of people are trapped in their homes or wherever they could find shelter, with supplies running low and several hospitals forced to shut down. The violence has also forced at least 12 hospitals in the capital area to shut down due to attacks or power outages. Top diplomats across four continents are now scrambling to broker a truce, with the UN Security Council set to discuss the crisis.

The violence has raised fears of civil war just as Sudanese citizens were trying to revive the drive for a democratic, civilian government after decades of military rule. Under international pressure, Burhan and Dagalo had recently agreed to a framework agreement with political parties and pro-democracy groups, but the signing was repeatedly delayed as tensions rose over the integration of the RSF into the armed forces and the future chain of command.

While the US, UN, and other countries have called for a truce, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates have also called for both sides to stand down. However, both generals have thus far dug in, demanding the other’s surrender.

The turmoil comes just days before Sudanese were to celebrate Eid al-Fitr, the holiday marking the end of Ramadan, the Islamic month of fasting. It is a tragic turn of events for the Sudanese people who had hoped for a peaceful transition to a democratic government. The situation in Sudan is rapidly deteriorating, and the world is watching to see if a peaceful resolution can be found to this violent power struggle.

Top diplomats from around the world are working to broker a truce between the warring factions, while the UN Security Council is set to discuss the crisis. The US and the UN have called for an immediate end to the violence, and other countries, including Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates, have also urged both sides to stand down.

The violence has raised fears of a civil war in Sudan, just as the country was making progress towards a democratic, civilian government after decades of military rule. In October 2021, General Abdel-Fattah Burhan, the commander of the armed forces, and General Mohammed Hamdan Dagalo, the head of the paramilitary Rapid Support Forces, jointly orchestrated a military coup.

Under international pressure, the two generals had recently agreed to a framework agreement with political parties and pro-democracy groups, but the signing was repeatedly delayed as tensions rose over the integration of the RSF into the armed forces and the future chain of command.

The current violence erupted over the weekend, with both sides using tanks, artillery, and other heavy weapons in densely populated areas. Fighter jets have also been spotted swooping overhead, while anti-aircraft fire lights up the skies.

The scenes of fighting in the capital, Khartoum, and its adjoining city, Omdurman, are unprecedented. At least 185 people have been killed and over 1,800 wounded so far, and there are fears that the actual number of casualties is much higher as many bodies remain on the streets in central Khartoum that no one can reach because of the clashes.

As the violence continues to spiral out of control, the situation in Sudan remains extremely volatile. With the country teetering on the brink of a civil war, it is more important than ever that the international community comes together to help broker a peaceful resolution to the crisis.